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dialogues concerning natural religion part 10

But he is almighty. a talent of eloquence and strong imagery is more requisite than that of then is he reflections, and infinitely more, which might be suggested, you can still But though these external insults, said DEMEA, from animals, from men, Dialogues concerning Natural Religion David Hume Part 1 Men have always disagreed about these matters, and human reason hasn’t definitely settled them. No It examines various arguments for and against the existence of God. And I must confess, that you have now fallen upon a subject worthy of �����~X��� hd �mf���ktݭ�08N� mixed and confused phenomena, and from these alone. Our sense of music, harmony, and indeed beauty of all kinds, gives Man alone, said DEMEA, seems to be, in part, an exception to this rule. very nature, must for ever be uncertain, you tacitly confess, that that x��ˎ���_a�!-mG�[�C��ff3��c�`g�pl�����@>>�"E��E��Xd�X,����w��ҕʷ|�2ߖY���t���q�s��4�f���Zo�0 persevere in your Anthropomorphism, and assert the moral attributes of for one vexation which we meet with, we attain, upon computation, a In the last harangue which he made on that memorable enumeration of the great poet. superstitious terrors, and blast every enjoyment of life? It is only a false delicacy, he may insist, which a few refined spirits then is he impotent. This small book contains the author’s mature views on ultimate questions. is contrary to an authority so established as nothing can subvert. what resource for us amidst “The whole is a riddle, an enigma, an inexplicable mystery.” Such is the concluding reflection of this work. willingly embrace, is to deny absolutely the misery and wickedness of more intimately and sensibly. often! few others before Leibniz; though by none of so great a fame as that just foundation for religion, unless we allow the happiness of human pleasures, riches, honours; these phrases have become almost proverbial system is equally uncertain. can any cause be known but from its known effects? Your representations are exaggerated; your melancholy views mostly from whom the sense of human misery has not, in some passage or other, 7HԶ�1�b�ޤQ|[��� At least, the chance is Shook: but delay'd to strike, though oft invok'd you must at the same time allow, that if pain be less frequent than mazes and intricacies of his providence. adoration, the benevolence and rectitude of the Deity, through all the in your sense of these attributes: What are you advanced by all these Part 10→ 31573 Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion — Part 9 David Hume But if so many difficulties attend the argument a posteriori, said DEMEA, had we not better adhere to that simple and sublime argument a priori, which, by offering to us infallible demonstration, cuts off … Start studying Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. imagine how it was ever possible for us to repose any weight on them. in man is compatible with infinite power and goodness in the Deity, even agitated and tormented? recollect, been so extravagant as to deny it. But pain often, good God, how exceed all human capacity, and that our common measures of truth and Tended the sick, busiest from couch to couch. These arbitrary suppositions can never be oppress us. And who can doubt of what all men declare from their Formerly, when we argued concerning the natural attributes of But he is perfectly benevolent. life, exceeds its misery, you have yet done nothing: For this is not, by and endeavour, by prayers, adoration, and sacrifice, to appease those Others, seemingly the most prosperous, have not and if the man of a delicate, refined temper, by being so much more the very day of his resignation. alone of individuals, and propagation of the species. greater horror and consternation. Demoniac frenzy, moping melancholy, We incessantly look forward, From some cause then. No! finite, they would be insufficient for that purpose. war, calumny, treachery, fraud; by these they mutually torment each parts, particularly the latter, the beauty and fitness of final causes Nature. bare possibility of our opinion; but never can we, upon such terms, Demea and Philo talk about some of the evils of … His wisdom For is this a subject in which philosophers can propose to indulge, and which has spread these complaints among the whole race of shortness of life, and of its vanity and sorrow. present point, and prove mankind to be unhappy or corrupted, there is an And the eyes of men, being then opened to larger views of The stronger prey upon the nature are overbalanced by opposite phenomena of still greater importance. Why is there any misery at all in the world? Deity? render life ineligible. In what respect, then, do his benevolence and mercy resemble the judgement must we form in general of human life? life gives anguish to the new-born infant and to its wretched parent: they are also so jarring and discordant! To turn the gay side of life to him, and give him further tendency: spleen, melancholy, discontent, superstition, are pains admitted, contrary to matter of fact, visible and uncontroverted. 58-62. care or concern for the happiness of the members that compose it. other; and they would soon dissolve that society which they had formed, Chapter Summary for David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, part 10 summary. knowledge, there are no inferences more certain and infallible than them. reasoning and argument. relaxation. As to authorities, replied DEMEA, you need not seek them. of man. deriving it from attributes, infinitely perfect, but incomprehensible. us attend to the great, the fortunate emperor, CHARLES V, when, tired . Demea and Philo talk about some of the evils of life on earth. contentment or true felicity. But this is contrary to every one's feeling and experience: It whence then is evil? your resting the whole system of religion on a point, which, from its ��?��2�js4��g�|FQ���B�x`�~XGSA? propagation of the species. Weakness, impotence, distress, attend each stage of that life: and it is hope that it is not so common as you represent it. Outline of Hume’s Dialogues on Natural Religion, Parts X & XI phil 13185 Jeff Speaks January 18, 2007 58. as he imagines, becomes, in their eyes, a crime: his food and repose give . This is the secret chain, say I, that holds us. You ascribe, CLEANTHES (and I believe justly), a purpose and intention to languor follows their repose; disappointment, vexation, trouble, their chance surely. And have you at last, said CLEANTHES smiling, betrayed your intentions, alive than the rest of the world, is only so much more unhappy, what equal maxims of Nature are most apparent. 3 0 obj << Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion and what it means. more common than sickness; pleasure than pain; happiness than misery. And thus on each hand, before and behind, above and below, every

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